Work & Money
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How to go from navigating passion to choosing a career

There is no way to know what you’ll be doing forever. Of course, most people have a dream career but sometimes our dream career choice isn’t right for our personality.

According to a Gallup poll, 30-57 percent of college freshman change their major at least twice before graduation. The same goes for people and their first job.

Millennials now have an average tenure of 1-3 years at their first place of employment. Is this a lack of direction or passion? Only we can decide what we are lacking.

Ultimately it’s not a bad thing to job hop even if you went to college or university seeking a specialty. The ‘F’ in life stands for flexibility and that includes our interests as we evolve into fully formed people.

Use college as a tool to explore your options. Talk to an advisor and take courses that ignite your passions. It is important to have a major chosen but don’t beat yourself up if you can not decide on a career right away.

If you’ve determined secondary education is not necessary for our career path. Map out a 5-year plan that shows how you intend to grow towards your dream job or entrepreneurship. A degree or education is not always necessary to fulfill a career goal.

Here are some tips to help you navigate being multi-passionate and the workforce fray:

Tip #1 Start with your interests and ask important questions. 

Start with your hobbies and what pure naturally drawn too. Now by all means, if you’re fascinated in Doug somehow. That ultimately would never support you financially then it should remain a hobby. You want to be happy, but you also want to be financially secure. Be curious, but choose to hustle smart.

To help navigate your interests to a career choice answer the following questions:

What makes you happy?

What brings you joy?

Could you see yourself doing this career for 10+ years?

Tip #2 Think long-term. 


Your career will be something you do for a long time. Think long-term and choose something that you feel wouldn’t burn you out too quickly.

It is okay if it takes you a few tries to find the right fit. There is more clarity in action that analyzation. True clarity comes from engagement. You’ll need to get involved in your interests in order to determine what fits you best for a career. Yes, be well thought out and pursue one idea at the time; but, also be aware once you’ve become stuck in a star of over-thinking. Find a balance between taking action and choosing the right move.

 

Tip #3 Job Shadow

 

If you already have a career in mind and you are just unsure whether to commit. Contact someone who is in that field and see if they would be kind enough to allow you to shadow them for 30 minutes so that you could get an idea of job tasks.

Above all don’t let it stress you out. I have changed my career path multiple times. It’s all about what is the best fit for what you want and your personality.

 

At the end of the day always remember that time is an ally. There are multiple examples of dreamers who did not launch their careers until later in adulthood. Peaking before 30 is rare. For example, Oprah was fired from her first job in television and the creator of KFC famously opened his first restaurant at the age of 71.

Look across history and you’ll find more success stories with valleys than peaks.

Seeking your passions is more a matter of will than getting it right the first time. Don’t call it a dream, make it a plan. Stay committed to your course with no regards for the detours.

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